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PredicateObject
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http://erlangen-crm.org/cur...
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http://collection.britishmu...
http://collection.britishmu...
'Ramo secco' bar, c. 6th-4th century BC. The name derives from the design of a 'dry branch'. Such bars are found principally in northern central Italy. An early date is suggested by the discovery of one piece in a stratum of an excavation near Gela in Sicily which has been dated by the pottery finds to the 6th century BC. Copper alloys were used as currency in northern and central Italy in the form of scrap and cast into bars. The earliest bars contained copper and iron, and apparently circulated from the 6th to 3rd centuries BC, mainly in Etruria. They were very brittle, and it seems likely that the iron was introduced to increase their weight. The weight was not fixed at this stage, but when the Romans started to make their own currency bars in about 300 BC, they adopted a standard of about 5 Roman pounds.
http://collection.britishmu...
Acquisition (From) :: Castellani, Alessandro to The British Museum ::, Acquisition date :: 1874 ::, Appeared in exhibition :: G68 Money Gallery :: case 1, section 3, Bibliograpic reference :: Haeb p.17 ::, Consists of :: iron ::, Dimension Weight :: 829.310g ::, Object type :: currency-bar ::, Production (Minted in) :: Etruria :: ?, Production Period / Culture :: Italic ::, Production date :: 6thC BC-4thC BC :: circa
http://collection.britishmu...
Exhibition label :: G68 Money Gallery :: Italy Copper alloys were used as currency in northern and central Italy in the form of scrap and cast into bars. The earliest bars contained copper and iron, and apparently circulated from the 6th to 3rd centuries BC, mainly in Etruria. They were very brittle, and it seems likely that the iron was introduced to increase their weight. The weight was not fixed at this stage, but when the Romans started to make their own currency bars in about 300 BC, they adopted a standard of about 5 Roman pounds. 3 ‘Ramo secco’ bar, c. 6th-4th century BC. The name derives from the design of a ‘dry branch’. Such bars are found principally in northern central Italy. An early date is suggested by the discovery of one piece in a stratum of an excavation near Gela in Sicily which has been dated by the pottery finds to the 6th century BC.
http://collection.britishmu...
Iron currency-bar ('ramo secco').
http://erlangen-crm.org/cur...
http://erlangen-crm.org/cur...
http://erlangen-crm.org/cur...